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Premier League manager’s are paid millions every season to ensure, in varying degrees, success or survival. The very top managers are paid to compete for the title.

José Mourinho would come under the heading of the very top managers, so here is my question:

If I, sat in my armchair watching the game, can say to my wife that if Fellaini comes on he will give away the free-kick from which Everton will equalise, how come Mourinho can’t work it out? It was rank bad management and, in fact, it was the manager who cost United the two points with that decision. Read the rest of this entry »

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After a short break to recharge the batteries WSA is back! Bigger and better than ever! Well, the same as it was before anyway. Much like Manchester United who, in the first ten minutes of their game against West Ham, appeared to be bigger and better than ever but weren’t really.

Having scored a very well worked goal in the opening minutes, thanks to a fine pass from Rooney to Mkhitaryan and a back heel from the Armenian to Ibrahimovic who clipped the ball over the advancing goalkeeper, they then proceeded to go back into their shell. Read the rest of this entry »

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Wayne Rooney, depending upon which newspaper you choose to believe, is paid anything form £200k – £300k per week.

He is proud of his achievements in the game. That is fine, but what has he actually achieved that nobody else has?

He is captain of Manchester United because there was nobody else at the time but, most people would agree, he should not be captain of United.

He is captain of England because he is captain of Manchester United and, again, most people would agree, it is not a position he should be holding. Read the rest of this entry »

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Like a chain smoker reaching the airport exit after an eight hour flight, like a shopaholic after a particularly long bank holiday weekend during which all of the shops have been closed, like a fish returning to water after almost too long out of it, these are all experiences which are accompanied, at some stage, with a massive sigh of relief. To return to normal having been out of the comfort zone for so long is a blessing. Just ask the fish! If speech were possible it would surely mop it’s brow, say “phew” and thank it’s lucky stars that it were still around to tell the tale. Read the rest of this entry »

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Czechoslovakia, Greece, Denmark and Portugal spring to mind as relatively recent winners of the European Championships. None of the four could be considered as serial winners of competitions.

Wales also stayed in the last competition for longer than England and even managed a 3-1 win over Belgium while England couldn’t even scrape a draw with Iceland and exited the tournament in their usual fashion, ie when there was still plenty of it left! Read the rest of this entry »

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José Mourinho appears to handle failure in the same way as he handles success. The success is well known and has been demonstrated on several occasions. It is usually a sullen look, a half smirk of “I knew we would win it” followed by a disappearing act leaving his players to enjoy the limelight while he sneaks off home to be with his family.

For failure take the same sequence but leave out the half smirk. He has yet to perfect a unique reaction to failure because it is still a relatively new experience for him. Read the rest of this entry »

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This is the latest incarnation in a fairly long history of the José Mourinho persecution complex. Nothing is his fault and the whole world is out to get him.

In truth this attitude helped to develop a siege mentality during his successful years at Chelsea and Real Madrid . He managed to convince his players that they were universally hated and nobody, except their own fans, wished them well.

It is not dissimilar to the way Sir Alex Ferguson used to motivate his teams. Proving to be the best was always, in his opinion, the only way to show those doubters and haters how wrong they were. Read the rest of this entry »

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(José Mourinho has a few things to think about before Sunday’s game with Swansea)

Manchester United have gone from being challengers to strugglers in a few short weeks.

Whether it is more surprising that they actually played well at the start of the season, or that they returned to their abject selves after a very short while is debatable.

What seems to have been missed by Moyes, van Gaal and now Mourinho, is that the United players appear to find it virtually impossible to pass the ball to each other. The amount of times a pass goes straight to an opposition player is now too numerous to be put down to bad luck or just erratic passing. Read the rest of this entry »

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A quarter-ish way through the season and things are, unfortunately for some, beginning to take shape.

Draws at home did not help the cause of either Manchester United or Tottenham Hotspur.

United should have beaten Burnley by three or four goals but their failure in front of goal may yet prove that Zlatan Ibrahimović was not the signing which should have been prioritised during the recent transfer window. Read the rest of this entry »

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If anybody was wondering which of the two managers placed the most importance on this game then it became obvious as soon as the teams were announced.

José Mourinho went with a strong line up which was only really missing Eric Bailly from what would be considered a first-choice eleven.

Pep Guardiola, on the other hand, went with a team which could best be described as mainly second choice. Read the rest of this entry »